Art & Design

ShawnLiv Top 5 OverUsed TypeFace In Graphic Design


In typography, a typeface (font) is a set of one or more fonts each composed of glyphs that share common design features. Each font of a typeface has their own specific weight, style, condensation, width, design and etc. Selecting an appropriate typeface or font for text usage is a key aspect of a design project. However, some of the typeface have been used in ways that we were not intended for or abused to the point of being hated. Here, the Top 5 OverUsed TypeFace In Graphic Design.

1. HELVETICA

Helvetica is a heavily used sans-serif typeface developed in 1957 by Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger with input from Eduard Hoffmann. On the other hand, many believe that it is spaced too tightly.


2. TIMES NEW ROMAN

Times New Roman is a serif typeface commissioned by the British newspaper The Times in 1931. Because it was used in a daily news­pa­per, the new font quickly became pop­u­lar among print­ers of the day. It was the default font in the widespread Microsoft Word. However, its lack of personality is the typeface’s strength, but also its weakness.

3. IMPACT

Geoffrey Lee designed a realist sans-serif typeface “Impact” in 1965. This typeface lay largely dormant for decades after its design. It is one of the Core fonts for the Web in Microsoft’s operating system. Personally, this is one of my flavor for title and heading. However, often I can be overwhelming and overshadow all your other message.

4. BRUSH SCRIPT MT

Brush Script is a lively font with brush-written characteristics, designed by Robert E. Smith in 1942. The letter forms are casual, yet look as if they have been written quickly. Brush Script inspired a hundred more handwriterly alternatives–Mistral, Chalkduster, Avalon, Reporter and etc.

5. TRAJAN

Trajan is a serif typeface designed in 1989 by Carol Twombly for Adobe. It is believed that the letters were first written with a brush, then carved into the stone. Trajan has become very popular, as seen in its nearly constant presence on movie posters, television shows and book covers.

To that end, we should experiment with another typeface. Find a more suitable typeface for your needs instead of repeating the same typeface over and over.

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